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Our Hearts Go Out to the People of Japan; Our Thoughts Turn to Disaster Recovery

by on March 31, 2011

With the aftereffects of Japan’s recent disaster in full force and events continuing to unfold day by day, the hearts of the B&L Associates team go out to the nation and the people affected by this overwhelming tragedy. The toll in terms of destruction, devastation and human life is virtually incomprehensible. Please join us by helping the Red Cross with their recovery efforts in Japan.

Click on the Red Cross logo below or text REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10.

Red_cross
At the same time, given the business we’re in, we can’t help but turn our thoughts toward the technological impact this disaster will have on Japan’s infrastructure. The sheer scope and magnitude of this and other disasters, like 9/11, the earthquake in Haiti, the floods in Australia and Hurricane Katrina in the U.S., highlight the extremes that businesses should consider in their disaster recovery planning.

But, especially considering the potential nuclear threat that has been part of the Japanese crisis, is there really any way to plan for a disaster so extreme? How many disaster recovery plans assume that recovery will take weeks, or even months or longer? How many plans consider that none of the company’s technology—from cell phones to servers—may be working for some time?

Clearly, you can’t plan and prepare for every permutation of every remotely possible disaster event—especially on a limited budget. The challenge for companies is to assess a wide range of potential events and to make sure your disaster recovery plan is as comprehensive as is possible and realistic for your business.

Unfortunately, it sometimes takes a true disaster to remind us that disaster recovery planning—and revisiting and testing that plan—is more than a theoretical exercise. It’s a real business need, and one that can determine whether your business will succeed, fail or even continue to exist after a disaster.

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